The AOG/ACC’s Bunkum Biography

For decades, the AOG/ACC have mislead Christianity, the media and the general public as to who they are. When you follow the history of David Cartledge and his record on how the New Apostolic Reformation gutted Australian Pentecostalism, then it is easy to spot how the attached biography of the ACC/AOG is a complete fabrication.

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It stopped being the Assemblies of God back in 1977 when the Apostles and Prophets of the New Apostolic Reformation (NAR) cult performed a coup d’état on the AOG back in 1977 – with Apostle David Yonggi Cho leading the assault alongside Andrew Evans, David Cartledge and other self-appointed apostles and prophets. It was a secretive and dishonest use of power by these power-hungry men. The fall of Pentecostalism in Australia can be attributed to the NAR assaulting the AOG in 1977. What happened was not a “voluntary cooperation”. Once the NAR took over the AOG, they rolled out a system whereby Christ’s church in Australia would be united under God’s Apostles and Prophets or be outside the will of God and die (i.e. religious, boring, mediocre, small numbers, irrelevant).

The AOG/ACC write,

WHO WE ARE

AUSTRALIAN CHRISTIAN CHURCHES is a movement of Pentecostal Churches in voluntary cooperation. Each individual church is self-governing, but commits itself to work together with other churches in the movement for the purpose of mutual support and the spread of the gospel in Australia and the world.

The Assemblies of God in Australia was formed in 1937 and has experienced consistent growth. It adopted a new name of Australian Christian Churches in 2007 and currently consists of over 1,000 churches with over 315,000 constituents, making it the largest Pentecostal movement in Australia.

In our churches you’ll find vibrant, contemporary Christians who love the Lord Jesus Christ and express that love in lively praise and worship and in caring relationships. Australian Christian Churches are Bible-loving, evangelical and Pentecostal, and are about connecting people to Jesus Christ.

OUR HISTORY 

THE AUSTRALIAN CHRISTIAN CHURCHES (formerly called Assemblies of God in Australia) was formed in 1937, and is unique among Christian movements in the world in that we are unable to trace our origins to any human leader.

Australian Pentecostalism in the early decades of the 20th century was greatly influenced by such figures as Mrs. Janet Lancaster, AC Valdez, Smith Wigglesworth, C L Greenwood and P B Duncan but none of these were individually responsible for the formation of the Assemblies of God in Australia.

The Assemblies of God in Australia formed out of a conference of the Assemblies of God – Queensland and the Pentecostal Church of Australia in Sydney, Easter 1937. It was recognised by the leaders of both movements that a more harmonious, co-operative and unified relationship was needed. C.L Greenwood was elected the first Chairman of the Assemblies of God in Australia and every state was granted autonomy in its own affairs as was each registered assembly.

In the early years of the movement growth was very slow but firm foundations were set in place. In 1948 the Commonwealth Bible College was established in order to train men and women for ministry. Various leaders also arose to bring leadership and direction to the movement such as Henry Wiggins, Philip Duncan, Edward Irish, James Wallace, Alec Davidson and Ralph Read.

In 1977, when Pastor Andrew Evans became the General Superintendent of the Assemblies of God in Australia, the movement experienced great growth, multiplying by over 13 times in the number of members and adherents and planting over 700 churches.

In May 1997 Pastor Brian Houston was elected the new National President of the Assemblies of God in Australia, and under his leadership, the movement continued to grow and expand its influence into the 21st century. It was renamed the Australian Christian Churches in April 2007.

Pastor Wayne Alcorn was elected the new National President by the National Conference in April 2009. Today, the ACC represents over 1,000 churches and more than 315,000 believers across Australia.

Source: Who We Are, Australian Christian Churches, https://www.acc.org.au/about-us/, Accessed 07/02/2016.

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